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A Guide to SOLAS Regulations for BNWAS Systems, AMI Marine

A Guide to SOLAS Regulations for BNWAS Systems

Bridge Navigational Watch Alarm System (BNWAS) required for older ships – A SOLAS Guide

A new SOLAS Amendment clarifies the installation of BNWAS for ships built before 1 July 2002.

The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS)

 

The Maritime Safety Committee at its 92nd session adopted Resolution MSC.350(92) with amendments to SOLAS coming into force on 1 January 2015. The amendments to SOLAS Chapter V now set a clear time schedule for the implementation of a BNWAS for ships built before 1 July 2002.

 

Time schedule for the required BNWAS is set as follows:

  1. passenger ships irrespective of size, not later than the first survey after 1 January 2016;
  2. cargo ships of 3,000 gross tonnage and upwards, not later than the first survey after 1 January 2016;
  3. cargo ships of 500 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 3,000 gross tonnage, not later than the first survey after 1 January 2017; and
  4. cargo ships of 150 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 500 gross tonnage, not later than the first survey after 1 January 2018.

Administrations may exempt ships from the requirement when such ships will be taken permanently out of service within two years after the implementation date.

The term “first survey” means the first annual survey, the first periodical survey or the first renewal survey whichever is due first after the date specified or any other survey if the Administration deems it to be reasonable and practicable, taking into account the extent of repairs and alterations being undertaken.

Germanischer Lloyd Logo Understanding SOLAS regulations

 

Germanischer Lloyd has published an actual FAQ regarding the BNWAS, as well as the adopted IMO Resolution MSC.350(92). Here below you can find some of the FAQs as published by GL.

When did the BNWAS come into force?

The performance standards for BNWAS are defined in MSC.128(75) which entered into force on 1 July 2003.SOLAS Ch. V, Reg.19, as amended by Resolution MSC.282(86), entered into force on 1 January 2011.SOLAS Ch. V, Reg.19, as amended by Resolution MSC.350(92), will enter into force on 1 January 2015.

When do I need a BNWAS?

1. The implementation schedule for the carriage of BNWAS according to SOLAS V, Reg.19.2.2.3, as amended by Resolution MSC.282(86), is as follows:

  • cargo ships of 150 gross tonnage and upwards and passenger ships of any size constructed on or after 1 July 2011;
  • passenger ships of any size constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey after 1 July 2012;
  • cargo ships of 3,000 gross tonnage and upwards constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey after 1 July 2012;
  • cargo ships of 500 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 3,000 gross tonnage constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey after 1 July 2013; and
  • cargo ships of 150 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 500 gross tonnage constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey after 1 July 2014.

2. The new Resolution MSC.350(92) now clarifies in SOLAS V, Reg.19.1.2.4, the implementation schedule for the carriage of BNWAS for ships constructed before 1 July 2002 as follows:

  • passenger ships irrespective of size, not later than the first survey after 1 January 2016;
  • cargo ships of 3,000 gross tonnage and upwards, not later than the first survey after 1 January 2016;
  • cargo ships of 500 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 3,000 gross tonnage, not later than the first survey after 1 January 2017; and
  • cargo ships of 150 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 500 gross tonnage, not later than the first survey after 1 January 2018.

Administrations may exempt ships constructed before 1 July 2002 from the requirement when such ships will be taken permanently out of service within two years after the implementation date.

View the AMI Marine BNWAS range HERE.

The vessel is already equipped with a BNWAS. Can I use it?

According to Resolution MSC.282(86), a BNWAS installed prior to 1 July 2011 may subsequently be exempted from full compliance with the standard adopted by IMO at the discretion of the Administration. Special advice or requirements by the Flag State Administration should be observed.

 

Bridge Navigation Watch Alarm System Watch Alarm Panel

Where should I install the reset push buttons?

According to the performance standard MSC.128(75), 5.1.4 reset facilities should only be available in positions on the bridge providing proper lookout. Means of activating the reset function should be easily accessible from the conning position, the workstation for navigating and manoeuvring, the workstation for monitoring and the bridge wings.

 

Is it necessary to install reset facilities on the bridge wings?

Reset facilities on the bridge wings should be installed if the bridge wing is defined as a workstation, i.e. if it is possible to observe all relevant external and internal information and control the manoeuvring of the ship.

Is it necessary to connect the BNWAS to the VDR?

According to the Code on Alerts and Indicators, Resolution A.1021(26), implemented on 18 January 2010, the BNWAS first-stage audible alarm and the malfunction of, or power supply failure to, the BNWAS are classified as a mandatory alarm. The BNWAS should be connected to the VDR on ships whose keel is laid on or after 18 January 2010.

Is it necessary to connect the status “activated” from autopilot to the BNWAS?

According to Resolutions MSC.282(86) and MSC.350(92), the BNWAS should be operational whenever the ship is underway at sea. A status from the autopilot is not required. A connection to the GPS or speed log is not allowed.

 

X810-R - X810 BNWAS Reset PanelMay I combine the second and third stage alarm?

According to MSC.128(75), 4.1.2.6 in vessels other than passenger vessels, the second and third stage remote audible alarms may sound in all the locations mentioned in 4.1.2.4 and 4.1.2.5 at the same time. If the second stage audible alarm is sounded in this way, the third stage alarm may be omitted.

 

Can I use the general alarm system for sounding the third alarm?

The audible alarm for the third stage should be easily identifiable by its sound and should indicate urgency. The sound should clearly differ from the fire alarm, general alarm, etc.

Written by safety4sea.com
Read the full article HERE

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